Posts tagged living

A Lesson In Forgiveness

"My daughter has not seen her biological dad since she was four. She’s 11 now. When she was two he contacted me and asked if I would allow him to terminate his parental rights so he could stop paying child support and I agreed.. I wanted to spare her the heartache of a revolving door father and the sacrifice of the financial support was well worth him never being able to disappoint her again.

I never lied to her about where he went or who her dad was.. I have always answered her questions in the most age appropriate way possible. When she was four he contacted me and told me he has been diagnosed with cancer and would like to see her. I set aside a day and we met in the park. He had asked for two hours. He stayed 20 minutes and we never heard from him again.

Over the summer we ran into somebody that knows him and they commented on how she looks like his other children. They elaborated that he has settled down and has a family now. My stomach tied itself in knots thinking of how hurtful that must be to my daughter.. I cut the conversation short and we got in the car to leave and that’s when I saw her smiling. She said ‘mom.. He figured out how to be a dad. That’s such a nice thing. I’m happy for his kids.’

And that’s the day an 11 year old taught me all I need to know about forgiveness.”

Jennifer Thomas (HONY page)

Once you see that their earthquakes are coming from your faults, you realize how deep trembles are felt. 

I felt a phrase fall out of my mouth like an atom bomb without knowing the effects would radiate for years.  

I was taught of cause and effect, how it is the ultimate truth that everything relies on. How a thought will turn to word as quickly as fuel becomes fire. Whether it’s for burning down a house or for keeping a lover warm. 

Why would I lift my voice just to put someone else down? You see, us humans, we have a habit of overpowering and taking what doesn’t belong to us. But I pray that we are making our way toward the moment when our tongues are the only things left for us to conquer.

G. Yamazawa

"She was filled with regret before she died. She felt like she’d failed us as a mother tremendously."
"Did she say something to you about it?"
"She never said anything, so I don’t have any tangible proof that she had regrets. But she had a very bad substance abuse problem. And I know she always wanted to be a good mother. So I separate my mom from her disease. I always imagine that my mom and an alcoholic were living in the same body. And I know that my mom loved us. And that she hated the alcoholic."
source: HONY

"She was filled with regret before she died. She felt like she’d failed us as a mother tremendously."

"Did she say something to you about it?"

"She never said anything, so I don’t have any tangible proof that she had regrets. But she had a very bad substance abuse problem. And I know she always wanted to be a good mother. So I separate my mom from her disease. I always imagine that my mom and an alcoholic were living in the same body. And I know that my mom loved us. And that she hated the alcoholic."

source: HONY

Tiny House Sacrifice Solutions

YOU SHALL ALL BE UNDER PETTICOAT RULE.

YOU SHALL ALL BE UNDER PETTICOAT RULE.

minim-calibre:

ladygray99:

And if you did not cry ugly ugly science!feels tears then there is something wrong with you.

Seriously.

I got goosebumps.

never thought i’d post a ru paul quote, to be honest. not sure why. 

never thought i’d post a ru paul quote, to be honest. not sure why. 

certain death

certain death

At least it can always be said of me, ‘Well… at least she’s honest.’
true story

Ze Frank insights and wisdom - 

You never know what direction the bus is going before you get on it. But right when I’d start something new before I had a chance to explore it or get good at it, people start telling me to stop! They want me to get off the bus and sit at the bus stop with them and make fun of the other busses as they go by- but I want to be on the bus! 

I’ve got the yuck in me too, don’t get me wrong. I’ve felt it when a friend belly laughs at something that I think is predictable and first I feel confusion and then all of a sudden I feel contempt. “No you should think that’s stupid!” As if my feeling of disgust was more valuable than his experience of sheer joy. But I wonder, I wonder if there’s a brief flash of loneliness between my confusion and contempt. 

Like any moment where I’m not able to participate in something is some sign that the world is slowly moving away from me. Like I’d rather be joined in unhappiness than be confronted with happiness that I can’t be a part of. 

Dayum. 

Dayum. 

Those French sure have a way with words. 

While I valued my happiness, I didn’t really see it as relevant.
Chris Herrin
Is winning all that counts? Are you absolutely sure about that?
Very little has been said about this…..On December 2, Basque athlete Iván Fernández Anaya was competing in a cross-country race in Burlada, Navarre. He was running second, some distance behind race leader Abel Mutai - bronze medalist in the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the London Olympics. As they entered the finishing straight, he saw the Kenyan runner - the certain winner of the race - mistakenly pull up about 10 meters before the finish, thinking he had already crossed the line.
Fernández Anaya quickly caught up with him, but instead of exploiting Mutai’s mistake to speed past and claim an unlikely victory, he stayed behind and, using gestures, guided the Kenyan to the line and let him cross first.
Ivan Fernandez Anaya, a Basque runner of 24 years who is considered an athlete with a big future (champion of Spain of 5,000 meters in promise category two years ago) said after the test:
"But even if they had told me that winning would have earned me a place in the Spanish team for the European championships, I wouldn’t have done it either. I also think that I have earned more of a name having done what I did than if I had won. And that is very important, because today, with the way things are in all circles, in soccer, in society, in politics, where it seems anything goes, a gesture of honesty goes down well."
He said at the beginning: “unfortunately, very little has been said of the gesture. And it’s a shame. In my opinion, it would be nice to explain to children, so they do not think that sport is only what they see on TV: violent kicks in abundance, posh statements, fingers in the eyes of the enemy …”

Is winning all that counts? Are you absolutely sure about that?

Very little has been said about this…..On December 2, Basque athlete Iván Fernández Anaya was competing in a cross-country race in Burlada, Navarre. He was running second, some distance behind race leader Abel Mutai - bronze medalist in the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the London Olympics. As they entered the finishing straight, he saw the Kenyan runner - the certain winner of the race - mistakenly pull up about 10 meters before the finish, thinking he had already crossed the line.

Fernández Anaya quickly caught up with him, but instead of exploiting Mutai’s mistake to speed past and claim an unlikely victory, he stayed behind and, using gestures, guided the Kenyan to the line and let him cross first.

Ivan Fernandez Anaya, a Basque runner of 24 years who is considered an athlete with a big future (champion of Spain of 5,000 meters in promise category two years ago) said after the test:

"But even if they had told me that winning would have earned me a place in the Spanish team for the European championships, I wouldn’t have done it either. I also think that I have earned more of a name having done what I did than if I had won. And that is very important, because today, with the way things are in all circles, in soccer, in society, in politics, where it seems anything goes, a gesture of honesty goes down well."

He said at the beginning: “unfortunately, very little has been said of the gesture. And it’s a shame. In my opinion, it would be nice to explain to children, so they do not think that sport is only what they see on TV: violent kicks in abundance, posh statements, fingers in the eyes of the enemy …”